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NL1VKL > ALL      14.06.19 02:33l 160 Lines 7373 Bytes #999 (0) @ EU
BID : 5441NL1VKL
Read: GAST
Subj: Re: SSID PACKET RADIO
Path: FFLB0X<DBO841<DBO595<DBX320<FRB024<BBS645<NL3BSM<NL3PRC<NL3VKL<NL3VKL
Sent: 190610/2056 @:NL3VKL.NBO.NLD.EU Sally 7.2.018  $:5441NL1VKL

Message from: NL1VKL@NL3VKL.NBO.NLD.EU

Quoting from a previous message...

Hi all,

As far as I know these recommendations are NOT specifically for packet radio 
but mainly used for APRS applications/stations. With CB packet radio it's 
even hard to comply. For example, we don't use balloons, aircrafts of even 
spacecrafts.

For packet radio there isn't really a recommendation as far as I can tell. 
Some groups/clubs have made their own recommendations which some others used 
too, but there isn't such thing as a world-wide, or even European 
recommendation or standard for SSID usage on CB packet radio. 

73! Dave de NL1VKL

====================================================================
 _____ __    ___   _____ _____ __    				  
|   | |  |  |_  | |  |  |  |  |  |      Sysop: Dave
| | | |  |__ _| |_|  |  |    -|  |__    QTH:   Uden - JO21TP
|_|___|_____|_____|\___/|__|__|_____|   BBS:   NL3VKL.NBO.NLD.EU
                                        QRV: 27.235 MHz (FM 1200bps)
NL3VKL BBS
NL5VKL Net/Rom node / internet gateway  https://nl5vkl.mijndingen.nl
====================================================================

** This message is generated with Sally 7.2.018
-----------------------------------------------------------------




> From: FRA001@FRA001.#31.OCCI.FRA.EU
> To  : ALL@EU
> 
> 
> APRS SSID Recommendations                                  6 Feb 2012
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Updated 6 Feb  2012 to clarify the title of this document to be
>                     SSID RECOMMENDATIONS not to imply any kind of 
>                     decoding "standard".  That original NMEA
>                     decodign standard is covered in the original spec
> Updated 9 June 2010 for more flexibility using 1,2,3,4 and 15
> Revised 2 June 2004 to add -10, -11, 12 and -15
> 
> SSID's have seen two different uses in APRS.  Initially as an ICON
> indicator back in the early 1990's.  But that is obsolete for over
> a decade.  Now SSID's are used as an informal way of indicating one 
> of several different typical APRS applications.
> 
> Since many small displays for the handheld and mobile operator show
> nearby APRS station callsigns that flash up on the screen, it is nice
> to have some idea of what type of station or activity might be 
> involved simply from the callsign SSID without having to push 
> buttons, search lists, or look at maps to find out more about them.  
> 
> SSID RECOMMENDATIONS:  It is very convenient to other mobile 
> operators or others looking at callsigns flashing by, to be able to 
> recognize some common applications at a glance.  Here are the 
> recommendations for the 16 possible SSID's (the limit of 16 comes 
> from the 4 bits available in the AX.25 protocol.  Note, The SSID of 
> zero is dropped by most display applications.  So a callsign with no 
> SSID has an SSID of 0.
> 
> -0 Your primary station usually fixed and message capable
> -1 generic additional station, digi, mobile, wx, etc
> -2 generic additional station, digi, mobile, wx, etc
> -3 generic additional station, digi, mobile, wx, etc
> -4 generic additional station, digi, mobile, wx, etc
> -5 Other networks (Dstar, Iphones, Androids, Blackberry's etc)
> -6 Special activity, Satellite ops, camping or 6 meters, etc
> -7 walkie talkies, HT's or other human portable
> -8 boats, sailboats, RV's or second main mobile
> -9 Primary Mobile (usually message capable)
> -10 internet, Igates, echolink, winlink, AVRS, APRN, etc
> -11 balloons, aircraft, spacecraft, etc
> -12 APRStt, DTMF, RFID, devices, one-way trackers*, etc
> -13 Weather stations
> -14 Truckers or generally full time drivers
> -15 generic additional station, digi, mobile, wx, etc
> 
> * One-way trackers should best use the -12 one-way SSID indicator
> because the -9's usually mean a ham in full APRS communication
> both message and voice.  The -9's can be contacted by APRS message
> or by Voice on his frequency included in his beacon, or on Voice
> Alert if he is in simplex range.  The -12's are just moving Icons
> on the map and since they have no 2 way communication for ham radio
> they are not generally of routine interest to other operators.
> 
> OBJECTS or INTERNET:  In addition, Objects or internet generated 
> stations can have any SSID, not just the original 16, since 
> Objects are not constrained by the AX.25 header and can have a 
> 9 byte name.  Here are some common OBJECT/Internet SSID's:
> 
> -63 for PSK63 HF stations
> -tt for APRS TouchTone users (DTMF)
> -ID for RFID
> -A through -Z for Dstar
> 
> SSID BACKGROUND:  Originally, in 1992, we had to use the SSID as 
> a way of indicating the type of station that transmitted a raw 
> NMEA-0183 GPS sting.  But in the mid 1990's we began indicating 
> any of the nearly 200 APRS symbols by the setting of the AX.25 
> TOCALL of "GPSxyz".  The "xyz" characters define the symbol from 
> the standard APRS symbol table www.aprs.org/symbols.html.
> 
> The GPSxyz concept worked so well, the original SSID associations 
> are no longer a required part of the spec.  But the conventions
> that evolved from those early SSID's are still encouraged as 
> noted above, for easy recognition of station type or activity by 
> when only the callsign is seen.
> 
> The -1, -2, -3, -4 and -15 are kept generic so that anyone with
> as many as 6 digipeaters, or 6 trackers or 6 weather stations or
> 6 vehicles can still have unique SSID's for each of his stations.
> Beyond 6, people will just have to use any SSID that suits their
> fancy.  In some areas there might be 15 digipeaters all under
> one guy's call!
> 
> SSID USAGE:  The SSID's also might give a hint as to how someone 
> is getting into APRS whether via satellite, a one-way tracker, a 
> mobile, an HT or even via DTMF or an RFID device or whether he is 
> doing something special.
> 
> For example, if you are doing something special, change your 
> SSID to -6 to alert others to your excitement, or to make the
> track-history begin and end on site, and not be tied to all 
> your other -9 travels.  Or use -6 SSID for a packet sent 
> via the ISS or APRS satellite or for a 6 meter test so the
> successful packet is preserved and not overwritten by the same
> radio the next time you use it not via the ISS on the 144.39 
> national channel.  By using separate SSID's the WEB data bases 
> will keep statistics and data separate from when you are working 
> normally on other bands with other SSID's.
> 
> So stick to the suggestions above for the obvious applications 
> where you can.  Of course these are not rigid.  If you have 
> more than 6 digipeaters, use any SSID you want.  These are only 
> guidelines to hint at a station's possible application when all  
> you can see easily is the callsign on a screen or in a list....
> 
> 



73! Dave de NL1VKL

====================================================================
 _____ __    ___   _____ _____ __    				  
|   | |  |  |_  | |  |  |  |  |  |      Sysop: Dave
| | | |  |__ _| |_|  |  |    -|  |__    QTH:   Uden - JO21TP
|_|___|_____|_____|\___/|__|__|_____|   BBS:   NL3VKL.NBO.NLD.EU
                                        QRV: 27.235 MHz (FM 1200bps)
NL3VKL BBS
NL5VKL Net/Rom node / internet gateway  https://nl5vkl.mijndingen.nl
====================================================================



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